Technology that touches lives

I-Limb: Bionic hands controlled by iPhone app

Self-destructing electronics

Electronics that disappear in a way that's programmable and controlled.

Smart Herb Garden

High technology meets your house plants. This smart garden lets everyone grow fresh herbs at home.

ESA launches drone app

Help build autonomous spaceships of the future with your own quadcopters.

Wetware advances

Biological logic gate built by splitting viral gene.

Lingua

Tuesday, September 17, 2013

Electronic tattoo tracks the heat running through your veins

10:46 AM Tuesday, September 17, 2013


Thermometers don't seem like they need reinventing. Just stick one beneath your tongue, wait a minute, and everything you need to know is right in front of you. But there's a lot more that temperature can tell us if we're paying close attention. "Normally on temperature, I'd think that’s not very interesting," John Rogers, a University of Illinois researcher, tells The Verge. "It turns out, measuring skin temperature, let’s say to a tenth of a degree ... that says something very meaningful about your physiological status and health."
Rogers has been working on a series of super-thin, flexible electronics that are both wearable and totally unnoticeable to their wearer — they're so thin, they've often been referred to as electronic tattoos. His research team's latest device contains a hypersensitive thermometer that he says can do the job of a quarter-million-dollar thermal infrared camera, even though it costs only pennies worth of parts. Not only can the wearable thermometer do the same job, Rogers says that it can do it better: because it attaches to the skin, it can measure temperature over a long period of time, during a person's day-to-day activities, and without its target shifting around and introducing inaccuracies to a camera's steady sensor.
Continue reading >>> [theverge]




Via >>> [nature]

Disney magic turns your ear lobe into a speaker

10:24 AM


A new project from Disney Research Pittsburgh lets you transmit sound through your body. Inshin-Den-Shin, which takes its name from a Japanese idiom for "unspoken mutual understanding," consists of nothing more than a voice-activated microphone, a computer, and a thin wire. After you talk into the microphone, the message is looped by the computer's sound card and sent back to the microphone as a high-voltage (300 Vpp), low-current (50 uA) electric signal.
Anyone holding the microphone then conducts that signal, and can pass it onto someone else by touching them near their ear. Touching another person's ear creates a modulated electrostatic field that in turn creates a tiny vibration of the ear lobe. The finger and ear lobe form a speaker of sorts, allowing the formerly inaudible signal to be heard. As demonstrated in Disney Research's video, the signal has sufficient power to pass through two people before being heard.
Continue reading >>> [Theverge]



Tuesday, July 2, 2013

AIRBOXLAB:Monitor indoor air pollution to improve your health and wellness

12:06 PM Tuesday, July 2, 2013


AIRBOXLAB is a smart device monitoring indoor air pollution, learning from your home and activities, helping you maintain the best possible air quality through personalized advices and predictive analytics. Based on 6 sensors embedded in an airflow designed cylinder, AIRBOXLAB monitor your indoor air pollution, forwarding AI processed data from the cloud to your smartphone, tablet or computer.
Continue reading >>> [Indiegogo]



Meet Filip, a simple smartwatch for young kids to call home

11:25 AM


Forget a smartphone; does your younger child need a smartwatch? The folks behind Filip think so, but the planned device is more of a take on a location and communications service for young children than it is about apps on the wrist. Still, there’s a relatively underserved market for wearable kids devices that provide the basics that a parent would want. And Filip is designed to be a device that young kids would want to wear: it’s rugged and splashproof. Filip watches in green Filip comes in four different colors and has a plain, almost toy-like look to it. But make no mistake, this little watch — yes, it tells time too — has some smarts. Embedded GPS, Wi-Fi and GSM radios support location tracking and two-way phone calls between parent and tot. Parents can use their iOS or Android phone to locate their kids wearing Filip. Plus, they can call their child and have an actual conversation: Filip is limited to send calls to up to five numbers only, which are configured by the parent. Filip can also receive one-way text messages.
Continue reading >>> [Gigaom]



Via >>> [Myfilip]

Friday, June 7, 2013

Office Weapons Will Teach You Everything You Need to Know to Kill Your Boss with Paperclips

3:48 PM Friday, June 7, 2013


We’ve all been there. You hate your job, you’re bored, and most of all- you very passionately want to harm your boss or co-worker. I know, me too. You can’t very well smuggle weaponry into the office, and all those items are both expensive and dangerous to yourself and others. So only if there were an instruction manual to help you turn everyday office supplies into WMDs (weapons of minimal destruction).

May I present Office Weapons: a complete step by step guide for thirty different office pranks because hey, we don’t really want you to harm people, but it’s more fun to have pencil fights at work than it is to process invoices. Some of these projects include:
    Office Booby Trap Simple Paper Clip Gun
    Office Sling Shot
    Arrows for Paper Clip Bow
    Office Stationery Darts
    Binder Clip Catapult
    Office Supplies Grappling Gun
    And more!

Continue reading >>> [Uberreview]



Wednesday, June 5, 2013

Wi-Fi signals enable gesture recognition throughout entire home

12:30 PM Wednesday, June 5, 2013


Forget to turn off the lights before leaving the apartment? No problem. Just raise your hand, finger-swipe the air, and your lights will power down. Want to change the song playing on your music system in the other room? Move your hand to the right and flip through the songs.
A hand gesture changes the TV channel.

University of Washington computer scientists have developed gesture-recognition technology that brings this a step closer to reality. Researchers have shown it’s possible to leverage Wi-Fi signals around us to detect specific movements without needing sensors on the human body or cameras.

By using an adapted Wi-Fi router and a few wireless devices in the living room, users could control their electronics and household appliances from any room in the home with a simple gesture.
Continue reading >>> [University of Washington]



Tuesday, June 4, 2013

ARAIG is an exoskeleton suit that gives players instant feedback for every shot taken in-game

11:18 AM Tuesday, June 4, 2013


As Real As It Gets (ARAIG) is a new Kickstarter project that hopes to give players a more immersive and realistic video game experience by delivering sound and feedback through a multi-sensory bodysuit. The peripheral, spotted by Polygon, is equipped with 16 vibratory sensors across the torso, 16 on the back and another 8 on the sides and arms. These rumble as a normal controller would in the player’s hands, giving users a more accurate sensation of where they’ve been hit. First person shooters such as Halo 4 and the upcoming Call of Duty: Ghosts seem like a perfect fit for the device, but there’s also scope for other genres to take advantage of the product. A spider crawling up the player’s back in Resident Evil, or a torrential downpour in Heavy Rain are but two examples of a more intricate execution.
Continue reading >>> [Thenextweb]

As Real As It Gets (ARAIG) is a new Kickstarter project that hopes to give players a more immersive and realistic video game experience by delivering sound and feedback through a multi-sensory bodysuit. The peripheral, spotted by Polygon, is equipped with 16 vibratory sensors across the torso, 16 on the back and another 8 on the sides and arms. These rumble as a normal controller would in the player’s hands, giving users a more accurate sensation of where they’ve been hit. First person shooters such as Halo 4 and the upcoming Call of Duty: Ghosts seem like a perfect fit for the device, but there’s also scope for other genres to take advantage of the product. A spider crawling up the player’s back in Resident Evil, or a torrential downpour in Heavy Rain are but two examples of a more intricate execution.
Continua a leggere >>> [Thenextweb]



Friday, May 31, 2013

DARPA's new mind-controlled prosthetics let patients feel again

9:36 AM Friday, May 31, 2013


Over the past decade, DARPA’s work on brain-controlled prosthetic limbs has led to some impressive breakthroughs, but with the development of novel neuromuscular interfaces, it’s making real headway toward mainstream bionic limbs in the near term. Today, the agency released some new information about its ongoing research, showing off arms that amputees can control with their remaining nerve and muscle tissue, and that even communicate back with the wearer, restoring a sense of touch.
Continue reading >>> [Theverge]

Over the past decade, DARPA’s work on brain-controlled prosthetic limbs has led to some impressive breakthroughs, but with the development of novel neuromuscular interfaces, it’s making real headway toward mainstream bionic limbs in the near term. Today, the agency released some new information about its ongoing research, showing off arms that amputees can control with their remaining nerve and muscle tissue, and that even communicate back with the wearer, restoring a sense of touch.
Continua a leggere >>> [Theverge]



Wednesday, May 29, 2013

Amputee in rural China builds bionic arms from steel and pulleys

1:36 PM Wednesday, May 29, 2013


When a devastating accident with a homemade fishing bomb destroyed both of Sun Jifa’s hands, the farmer from Jilin province in Northern China couldn’t afford the expensive prosthetics provided by the hospital. Faced with a family to take care of and rudimentary prostheses that made it impossible to do farm work, Sun began an eight-year quest to design and build his own bionic arms using whatever materials he had available. After a series of prototypes built from pulleys, wires, and scrap metal, Sun settled on a final design that proved so successful that amputees in neighboring towns have been clamoring to buy them.
Continue reading >>> [Theverge]



Friday, May 10, 2013

A wireless network with frickin’ laser beams on the ceiling

11:46 AM Friday, May 10, 2013


A new product called Beamcaster distributes beams of light to create wireless networks, providing an alternative or supplement to Wi-Fi and eliminating much of the cabling used to connect office workers to the Internet and corporate networks. RiT Wireless, the makers of Beamcaster, demonstrated the technology this week at the Interop networking conference in Las Vegas. A Beamcaster "optical distribution unit" is mounted on a ceiling, distributing invisible beams of light to eight "smart outlets." (You might call them "frickin' laser beams.") In a typical setup, the smart outlets could be placed on top of a cubicle wall and hook up to PCs via Ethernet, giving workers' access to the Internet and corporate networks. Connecting those smart outlets to standard switches would increase the number of PCs each smart outlet could connect to. This setup reveals an obvious limitation—smartphones and tablets typically don't have Ethernet ports. However, a Beamcaster smart outlet can connect to a Wi-Fi router, distributing the signal to Wi-Fi-capable devices. Future versions of the smart outlet will have 802.11ac Wi-Fi built in, RiT Wireless CTO Erez Ben Eshay told me at the Beamcaster booth yesterday.
Continue reading >>> [Arstechnica]

Una rete senza fili con pazzeschi raggi laser dal soffitto


Un nuovo prodotto chiamato Beamcaster distribuisce fasci di luce per creare reti wireless, fornendo una alternativa o complemento alla connessione Wi-Fi e permette di eliminare gran parte del cablaggio utilizzato per collegare gli impiegati alla rete aziendale e Internet. RIT wireless, i creatori di Beamcaster, ha mostrato la tecnologia questa settimana alla conferenza di networking Interop a Las Vegas. Un Beamcaster "unità di distribuzione ottica" è montato su un soffitto, distribuendo fasci invisibili di luce a otto "punti intelligenti". (Si potrebbe chiamarli "pazzeschi raggi laser.") In una configurazione tipica, le prese intelligenti potrebbero essere collocate in cima alla parete delle scrivanie da ufficio e agganciare al PC via Ethernet, dando ai lavoratori l'accesso a Internet e alle reti aziendali. Collegamenti di tali punti di distribuzione intelligenti aumenterebbero il numero di PC connessi. Questa configurazione rivela un evidente limitazione: smartphone e tablet in genere non dispongono di porte Ethernet. Tuttavia, una presa intelligente Beamcaster è in grado di connettersi a un router Wi-Fi per la distribuzione del segnale ai dispositivi Wi-Fi. Le versioni future delle prese intelligente avranno la 802.11ac Wi-Fi integrato, RIT Wireless CTO Erez Ben Eshay ha detto allo stand Beamcaster ieri.
Continua a leggere >>> [Arstechnica]



Thursday, May 9, 2013

Google Glass in real life

4:58 PM Thursday, May 9, 2013


A couple of real life Google Glass videos

Un paio di video sui Google Glass nella vita reale





 
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